HP LaptopHP Omen 15

HP Omen 15 disassembly and SSD, RAM, HDD upgrade options

In this guide, I’ll explain how to disassemble HP Omen 15 to remove the bottom case, battery, SSD, wireless card, heat sink, cooling fan and motherboard. Refer to this guide, you can repair, upgrade and clean your HP Omen 15.

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There is a round of rubber mat covered the bottom case.

Remove the rubber mat. You can find some screws securing the bottom case.
Remove all screws.

Pry up and remove the bottom case.

Once the bottom case was removed, you can get access to the internal components, including battery, wireless card, SSD, speakers, heat sink and cooling fan.

Disconnect the battery power cable and remove the screws. The battery can be removed.

HP Omen 15 comes with a 15.2v, 58wh Li-polymer battery, battery cells from LG.

Remove the screw securing the wireless card.

Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260 wireless card. HP part number: 784645-006.

Uncover the black tape.

Remove the screw securing the SSD.

HP Omen 15 comes with a Samsung 512GB M.2 SSD. HP part number: 788613-001, 752822-0001.

Loosen all the screws securing the heat sink. Remove all screws securing the cooling fan.

Disconnect two cooling fan cables from the motherboard.

HP Omen 15 heat sink, cooling fan assembly. HP part number: 788800-001.

Uncover the stickers, you can see the RAM is soldered on the motherboard.
HP Omen 15 not provide spare RAM slot, so the RAM cannot upgrade.

This is a special screw securing the motherboard, so you cannot remove the motherboard unless you have the special screwdriver.

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19 Comments

  1. Great, this is just what I was looking for.

    Quick question.. Would it be possible to replace the SSD with a Samsung 840 EVO (1000GB, mSATA) ?

    tomshardware.com/reviews/samsung-840-evo-msata-review,3716.html

    It looks to be a different physical size than the one in this breakdown.

    1. The drive is not a msata drive, but the newer spec m.2.

      newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=100006550%2040000636%20600488413&IsNodeId=1

      You would need a m.2 drive to swap it out. The good news is that m.2 is slated to replace msata. So, at least you would be moving in the same direction as the market in terms of technology.

  2. Hello,
    I’d like to know the best way to glue the rubber in the back again, since it looks like it doesn’t do it after you’ve pulled it.
    Thank you, great guide!

  3. Awesome guide. I just bought one of these and the screen seems slightly wobbly, is it possible to tighten?

  4. Can anyone confirm how the airflow is sucked in and blown out from the Laptop?
    (eg: sucked in at bottom of laptop and blown from the vents??) Right?

    1. Air intake is through the bottom of the laptop and out the back. The rubber ring around the bottom of the laptop is split in two areas allowing air in on a flat surface. Air intake is limited a bit in this way by the rubber ring, can solve that with two slightly taller rubber feet to put in the corners in the back.

  5. To replace the m.2 you do not need to remove the cooling fans. I did replace the standard drive with a Samsung SSD 850 EVO M.2 500GB drive.

    Notes:
    1. Remove screws phase, only silver headed screws. Black screws are for the fans and do not hinder the case removal.

    2. To see the seam you need to separate the bottom from, open the screen part way, then bend one corner towards the screen, you will see it separate.

    3. I had to move the “special screw” noted as securing the mother board to the other hole in order to secure the new SSD. The one it came with was the shorter type, just a pare of pliers to loosen it a tad, it’s little more than finger tight. (Think of it like the old case screws for mounting your motherboard, you moved them where needed for the top screw to secure the SSD)

    4. During re-assemble, make sure to secure the back side first, took me a few tries to make sure the back plane (where the USB slots are) is all the way in before snapping down towards the front.
    Happy upgrading 🙂 Good luck.

  6. Awesome guide. I’m a newbie but can i switch the Mini displayport to a thunderbolt 3 ? since they have the same geometry.

  7. Has anyone successfully up-graded an Omen 15’s SSD to 1TB module (or larger)? If so please can you confirm the manufacturer, part number, and where purchased?

    Equally if you tried but were unsuccessful or had issues please let me know.

    Thanks!

  8. Hey does anyone know how to take apart the display part of the laptop? My hinge is a little wonky and I am planning to replace the battery so I will be taking the unit apart then. Any help is appreciated.

    1. I am in the exact same boat. My hinge is super wonky and it makes a horrible sound every time I close it. And I need to replace the battery soon anyways. I’d love to find a way to fix the hinge

      1. Hey, I fixed it and it’s great now. I wanted to also repaste my GPU as well as change battery, but of all these fixing the hinge was pretty simple .

        Basically you can pry the actual LCD panel away from the metal part, and then with the screwdriver get in and carefully tighten the screws. Each hinge will have 3 screws, and they are positioned right above the parts of the metal hinge rod where the dividers are. Just get in with a plastic card and slowly pry off the screen – it has some bend so you won’t break it easily. I suggest you find a manual for how to do this job. This page should help – http://h20564.www2.hp.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?docId=c04517207

    1. Absolutely not, you can clearly see they’re soldered to the board like the RAM, but the lack of upgradability is the least of its problems. I managed to buy a HP Omen 15-5010nr off ebay for dirt cheap, but otherwise I would not recommend this ultrabook. Loud, bad construction that makes it hard to pack and uncomfortable to work on for long periods, poor I/O all situated at the rear (I’ve had thumb drives bend because the usb ports have so little clearance), terrible speakers, weak battery, power hungry kepler dGPU, horrible Nvidia Optimus implementation that bottlenecks all graphics and causes tons of rendering errors which can’t be disabled.

      The newer models 1080p versions have better power management and noise with replaceable RAM it looks like. It’s priced competitively, but there are better options out there.